Celtic Ceridwen Statue, Celtic & Gods Statues, Ceridwen Celtic Goddess of Knowledge and The Cauldron Statue

Celtic Ceridwen Statue, Celtic & Gods Statues, Ceridwen Celtic Goddess of Knowledge and The Cauldron Statue

Ceridwen “Celtic Goddess of Knowledge” and The Cauldron Statue

Celtic Ceridwen Statue, crafted by master artisan using high quality designer resin and cold cast bronze method. Cold cast bronze is the casting method of mixing bronze material and resin together in order to create detailed statues with metallic surface. Ceridwen was an enchantress in Welsh medieval legend. Medieval Welsh poetry refers to her as possessing the Cauldron of Poetic Inspiration (Awen) and the Tale of Taliesin recounts her swallowing her servant Gwion Bachwho is then reborn through her as the poet Taliesin. Ceridwen is regarded by many modern Pagans as the Celtic Goddess of rebirth, transformation, and inspiration. This beautiful cast resin statue depicts Ceridwen stirring her cauldron of Awen. The statue has a metallic bronze finish, with hand painted accents to bring out the wonderful detail. She makes a great gift for anyone looking for a touch or inspiration.

Ceridwen or Cerridwen was an enchantress in Welsh medieval legend. She was the mother of a hideous son, Morfran, and a beautiful daughter, Creirwy. Her husband was Tegid Foel and they lived near Bala Lake (Llyn Tegid) in north Wales. The earliest documented spelling of the name Kerdwin is Cyrridven, which occurs in the Black Book of Carmarthen. Sir Ifor Williams translates this name as “crooked woman“, although the precise meaning of the stems cyrrid and cwrr (sometimes translated as “crooked” or “bent“) is uncertain. Ben/ven means “woman” or “female“. If wen is not a corruption of either of these, then it may derive from the adjective gwyn (fem. gwen), meaning “fair“, “beloved“, “blessed“, or “sacred“. Wen is sometimes suffixed to the names of female saints (e.g. Dwynwen).

In 19th century literature and etymology the name Ket, Ked and variants were assumed to relate to the Goddess Ceridwen. According to the late medieval Tale of Taliesin, included in some modern editions of the Mabinogion, Ceridwen’s son, Morfran (also called Afagddu), was hideously ugly, particularly compared with his beautiful sister Creirwy, so Ceridwen sought to make him wise in compensation. She made a potion in her magical cauldron to grant the gift of wisdom and poetic inspiration, also called Awen. The mixture had to be boiled for a year and a day. Ceridwen Celtic Goddess of Knowledge and The Cauldron Statue sizes: 6.5 inches / 16.5 cm x 6.5 inches / 16.5 cm x 6.25 inches / 16 cm.


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