Armored Medieval Knight Statue, Animals, Horses & Medieval Statues, Medieval Knight “in Armour on Armored Horse” Statue

Armored Medieval Knight Statue, Animals, Horses & Medieval Statues, Medieval Knight "in Armour on Armored Horse" Statue

Medieval Knight “in Armour on Armored Horse” Statue

This Armored Medieval Knight Statue have an exquisite craftsmanship, realized with premium sculpted cold cast bronze, real bronze powder mixed with resin. Hand-painted in bronze finish to give a high-quality antique look without sacrificing the details. Great addition to any Medieval collection. Knights were the most-feared and best-protected warriors on the medieval battlefield. They were also the most fashionably dressed and best-mannered members of society. Medieval Armour is an historical type of personal body armour made from bronze, iron, or steel plates, culminating in the iconic suit of armour entirely encasing the wearer. Full medieval steel armour developed in Europe during the Late Middle Ages, especially in the context of the Hundred Years’ War, from the coat of plates worn over mail suits during the 14th century. In Europe, armour reached its peak in the late 15th and early 16th centuries. The full suit of armour, also referred to as a panoply, is thus a feature of the very end of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance period. Its popular association with the “medieval knight” is due to the specialised jousting armour which developed in the 16th century. Full suits of Gothic Armour were worn on the battlefields of the Burgundian and Italian Wars.

The most heavily armoured troops of the period were heavy cavalry, such as the gendarmes and early cuirassiers, but the infantry troops of the Swiss Mercenaries and the Landsknechts also took to wearing lighter suits of “three quarters” munition armour, leaving the lower legs unprotected. The use of armour declined in the 17th century, but it remained common both among the nobility and for the cuirassiers throughout the European wars of religion. After 1650, armour was mostly reduced to the simple breastplate (cuirass) worn by cuirassiers. This was due to the development of the flintlock musket, which could penetrate armour at a considerable distance. For infantry, the breastplate gained renewed importance with the development of shrapnel in the late Napoleonic wars. The use of steel plates sewn into flak jackets dates to World War II, replaced by more modern materials such as fibre-reinforced plastic since the 1950s. Partial medieval armour, made out of bronze, which protected the chest and the lower limbs, was used by the ancient Greeks, as early as the late Bronze Age. The Dendra Panoply protected the entire torso on both sides and included shoulder and neck protections. Less restrictive and heavy armor would become more widespread in the form of the muscle cuirass during classic antiquity before being superseded by other types of armor.

Parthian and Sassanian heavy cavalry known as Clibanarii used cuirasses made out of scales or mail and small, overlapping plates in the manner of the manica for the protection of arms and legs. Armor in the form of the Lorica Segmentata was used by the Roman Empire between the 1st century BC and 4th century AD. Single plates of metal armour were again used from the late 13th century on, to protect joints and shins, and these were worn over a mail hauberk. Gradually the number of plate components of medieval armour increased, protecting further areas of the body, and in barding those of a cavalryman’s horse. Armourers developed skills in articulating the lames or individual plates for parts of the body that needed to be flexible, and in fitting armour to the individual wearer like a tailor. The cost of a full suit of high quality fitted armour, as opposed to the cheaper munition armour (equivalent of ready-to-wear) was enormous, and inevitably restricted to the wealthy who were seriously committed to either soldiering or jousting. The rest of an army wore inconsistent mixtures of pieces, with mail still playing an important part. Medieval Knight “in Armour on Armored Horse” Statue sizes: 10 inches / 25.5 cm x 3.5 inches / 9 cm x 10.25 inches / 26 cm.


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Legendary Medieval Knight Statue, Medieval & Dragons Statues, Legendary Medieval Knight George Slaying the Dragon Statue

Legendary Medieval Knight Statue, Medieval & Dragons Statues, Legendary Medieval Knight George Slaying the Dragon Statue

Legendary Medieval Knight George Slaying the Dragon Statue

Legendary Medieval Knight Statue premium sculpted cold-cast bronze with real bronze powder mixed with resin. Hand-painted color accents on the bronze finish to give a high-quality antique look without sacrificing the details. The intricate craftsmanship of this statue is simply breathtaking. Painted and illustrated by countless artists from the Crusades to the Renaissance, the legend of St. George and the Dragon is modeled wonderfully in this recreation. The attention to detail in the armor, the horse, and the dragon is exceptional. The hand-painted color accents elevates this from a simple bronze statue to a true work of art. The origins of this legend vary, some say that St. George was a Roman soldier, a Crusader knight, or possibly pre-Christianity myths. In this version, St. George slays the Dragon that is terrorizing a town in Libya, and the lord sacrifices his only daughter as tribute. George kills the dragon, saves the princess, and converted the city to Christianity. The legend of Saint George and the Dragon tells of Saint George (died 303) taming and slaying a dragon that demanded human sacrifices.

The story goes that the dragon originally extorted tribute from villagers. When they ran out of livestock and trinkets for the dragon, they started giving up a human tribute once a year. This was acceptable to the villagers until a well-loved princess was chosen as the next offering. The saint thereupon rescues the princess chosen as the next offering. The narrative was first set in Cappadocia in the earliest sources of the 11th and 12th centuries, but transferred to Libya in the 13th-century Golden Legend. The narrative has pre-Christian origins (Jason and Medea, Perseus and Andromeda, Typhon, etc.), and is recorded in various saints’ lives prior to its attribution to St. George specifically. It was particularly attributed to Saint Theodore Tiro in the 9th and 10th centuries, and was first transferred to Saint George in the 11th century. The oldest known record of Saint George slaying a Dragon is found in a Georgian text of the 11th century. The legend and iconography spread rapidly through the Byzantine cultural sphere in the 12th century. It reached Western Christian tradition still in the 12th century, via the crusades.

The knights of the First Crusade believed that St. George, along with his fellow soldier-saints Demetrius, Maurice and Theodore, had fought alongside them at Antioch and Jerusalem. The legend was popularised in Western tradition in the 13th century based on its Latin versions in the Speculum Historiale and the Golden Legend. At first limited to the courtly setting of Chivalric romance, the legend was popularised in the 13th century and became a favourite literary and pictorial subject in the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance, and it has become an integral part of the Christian traditions relating to Saint George in both Eastern and Western tradition. The iconography of military saints Theodore, George and Demetrius as horsemen is a direct continuation of the Roman-eraThracian horseman” type iconography. The iconography of the dragon appears to grow out of the serpent entwining the “tree of life” on one hand, and with the draco standard used by late Roman cavalry on the other.

Horsemen spearing serpents and boars are widely represented in Roman-era stelae commemorating cavalry soldiers. A carving from Krupac, Serbia, depicts Apollo and Asclepius as Thracian horsemen, shown besides the serpent entwined around the tree. Another stele shows the Dioscuri as Thracian horsemen on either side of the serpent-entwined tree, killing a boar with their spears. The development of the hagiographical narrative of the dragon-fight parallels the development of iconography. It draws from pre-Christian dragon myths. The Coptic version of the Saint George legend, edited by E. A. Wallis Budge in 1888, and estimated by Budge to be based on a source of the 5th or 6th century, names “Governor Dadianus“, the persecutor of Saint George as “the dragon of the abyss“. A greek myth with similar elements of the legend is the battle between Bellerophon and the Chimera. Legendary Medieval Knight George Slaying the Dragon Statue sizes: 13.5 inches / 34 cm x 7.6 inches / 19 cm x 13.8 inches / 35 cm.


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Gothic Knight Armor Statue, Medieval & Gothic Statues, King’s Medieval Guard Gothic Knight Armor Statue

Gothic Knight Armor Statue, Medieval & Gothic Statues, King's Medieval Guard Gothic Knight Armor Statue

King’s Medieval Guard Gothic Knight Armor Statue

Gothic Knight Armor Statue, hand-cast using real crushed stone bonded with high quality designer resin, each piece is individually hand-painted by the artisans. At more than a yard tall, this incredibly detailed, museum replica knight is a true statement piece! Quality designer resin museum replica is clad in 16th century style Italian armor, proudly displaying his sword and a chestplate emblazoned with intricately sculpted lions. Features a two-tone metallic finish. Castle guard, in the European feudal tenure, an arrangement by which some tenants of the king or of a lesser lord were bound to provide garrisons for royal or other castles. The obligation would in practice be discharged by subtenants, individual knights who held their fiefs by virtue of performing such service for a fixed period each year. Because the castle concerned might be far from the fiefs charged to guard it, the duty was early commuted for money payments. Some castle guards, or ward rents, survived into modern times.

Knight service, in the European feudal system, military duties performed in return for tenures of land. The military service might be required for wars or expeditions or merely for riding and escorting services or guarding the castle. To obtain such service, a lord could either enfeoff (grant a fief to) one man for direct and personal service or enfeoff someone who would bring with him other knights. The number of knights supplied usually bore some relation to the size of the fief. Originally services and equipment were supplied at the vassal’s expense. The normal period of service was 40 days a year. In England knight service was held due to the king only. In France, however, the lesser nobility as well could claim such service and thus were able to achieve great personal power. As time went on, variations developed. From the mid 12th century fewer knights were being summoned, but they often were serving for longer than 40 days; sometimes service due was rendered in scutage, a tax paid in lieu of service. By 1300 the decline in the importance of cavalry, the increasing use of mercenaries, and the resistance of tenants had combined to reduce substantially the number of knights summoned from any fief. King’s Medieval Guard Gothic Knight Armor Statue measures: 10.5 inches / 26 cm x 13.5 inches / 34 cm x 39.5 inches / 1 m.


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